Frequently Asked Questions

To obtain further updates or contact the team directly, please email hazelwood.au@engie.com

Section One

Who will undertake demolition of the Power Station?

Who will undertake demolition of the Power Station?

Who will undertake demolition of the Power Station?

ENGIE Hazelwood has appointed Delta Group, a Victorian based nationally recognized company, to undertake the demolition work.

A broader team of national and international subject matter experts specializing in demolition engineering have been involved in developing the demolition approach so as to develop a safe and effective program of works, and demonstrate to regulatory agencies and key stakeholders a robust process to meet legislative compliance.

How will the chimneys be demolished?

How will the chimneys be demolished?

How will the chimneys be demolished?

The chimneys will be demolished by controlled collapse engineering using detonation charges located at the base of each chimney, enabling the chimneys to fall in the designed direction and sequence.

The eight chimneys will be demolished in a single continuous event, with charges detonated about four seconds apart.

The principal contractor, Delta Group with national and international engineering subject matter experts, have identified controlled collapse as the safest methodology for demolition. This method is designed to reduce risks to all persons so far as is reasonably practicable.

Controlled collapse is an industry practice adopted in Australia and around the world for the demolition of concrete chimneys and structures of similar heights and composition.

Extensive consultations have been undertaken with regulatory agencies with regards to the basis for the selection of this demolition methodology.

This method has been certified for the Hazelwood chimneys by an independent Relevant Building Surveyor who has issued an Explosive Demolition Permit.

Why choose this method?

Why choose this method?

Why choose this method?

The principal contractor, Delta with national and international engineering subject matter experts, have identified controlled collapse as the safest methodology for demolition. This method is designed to reduce risks to all persons so far as is reasonably practicable.

Controlled collapse is an industry practice adopted in Australia and around the world for the demolition of concrete chimneys and structures of similar heights and composition.

Extensive consultations have been undertaken with regulatory agencies with regards to the basis for the selection of this demolition methodology.

This method has been certified for the Hazelwood chimneys by an independent Relevant Building Surveyor who issued a Explosive Demolition Permit in December 2019.

Has a similar demolition occurred before?

Has a similar demolition occurred before?

Has a similar demolition occurred before?

Controlled collapse is a standard demolition methodology used worldwide. Since 2015 there have been more than 50 projects worldwide where chimneys have been successfully demolished using the controlled collapse method.


Section Two

Do you know what day and time will it be?

Do you know what day and time will it be?

Do you know what day and time will it be?

Demolition of the chimneys is most likely to occur in between May and July 2020 on a day that has favourable meteorological conditions.

Information on the proposed day will be communicated with a minimum of seven days’ notice prior to the demolition. Assuming the weather is appropriate, the final go/no-go decision is expected to be made two hours before the detonation time.

It is expected the chimney demolition will occur during the daytime hours (consistent with Australian Standard – AS2187.2 – Explosives – Storage and Use, Part 2 Use of Explosives), with the specific time to be confirmed dependent upon weather conditions.

If the weather forecast is unfavourable, the demolition will be postponed

Why are the weather conditions so important?

Why are the weather conditions so important?

Why are the weather conditions so important?

The safety of workers and the surrounding communities is our primary concern. We must wait for favourable weather conditions on the day of the event.

Extensive modelling has been undertaken to identify the weather conditions for demolition of the chimneys, particularly from the perspective of the minimisation of local air quality impacts.

If the weather forecast is unfavourable, the demolition will be postponed.

This means the date and time of the demolition exercise could change a number of times and, if necessary, at the last minute.

What happens if it doesn’t go as planned?

What happens if it doesn’t go as planned?

What happens if it doesn’t go as planned?

Contingency plans are in place in the unlikely event that the demolition does not go as planned. National and international engineering subject matter experts will be available to provide engineering direction for rectification in the unlikely event of any issues.

The exclusion zone around the area and some road closures will remain in place until the chimneys have all been demolished and the area is declared safe.


Section Three

What are the chimneys made of and what happens to the material once they are demolished?

What are the chimneys made of and what happens to the material once they are demolished?

What are the chimneys made of and what happens to the material once they are demolished?

The chimneys were built in the 1960s and comprise steel reinforced concrete structure with minimal asbestos bonded within pre-formed concrete vent pipes. When the chimneys are demolished the minimal quantity of asbestos is expected to remain within the concrete vent pipes, which has been independently assessed.

The charges are located at the base of each of the chimneys, remote from the concrete vent pipes.

Once the chimneys are on the ground, water dust suppression systems will be used during the loading of the concrete and steel reinforcement rubble into trucks. Transport to the EPA-licenced onsite asbestos cell will be via designated internal haul roads. This process will be completed by licenced asbestos removalists, consistent with the approved asbestos management plan.

Will there be dust in the air?

Will there be dust in the air?

Will there be dust in the air?

The demolition of the eight Hazelwood chimneys will create a level of airborne dust.

Modelling has been undertaken to identify favourable meteorological conditions which will minimise dust impacts.

The modelling has been conducted on a conservative basis and assumes there are no mitigating control measures put in place to minimise dust. The section below outlines water suppression methods that will be used to mitigate the level of airborne dust.

What will be done to reduce dust?

What will be done to reduce dust?

What will be done to reduce dust?

Delta Group has designed and installed water spray systems to assist in the mitigation and suppression of airborne dust. As well, multiple water pools will be set up and detonated in conjunction with the chimney demolition to produce electrostatic charged water mist designed to bind to and further reduce the dispersal of dust.

Have any studies taken place?

Have any studies taken place?

Have any studies taken place?

A detailed Health Risk Assessment (HRA) based on plume modelling, has predicted that airborne asbestos and respirable crystalline silica and PM10 and PM2.5 levels will be within acceptable levels.


Section Four

Will I be able to get up close?

Will I be able to get up close?

Will I be able to get up close?

To ensure the safety of the community and the relevant workforce, there will be a strictly controlled 500-metre exclusion zone in place around the chimneys, in addition to increased site security controls.

Some road closures will also be required near the former power station, on Brodribb Road, the Yinnar Road and Nadenbousch’s Road. Details of these closures and other traffic management is being managed in consultation with both Regional Roads Victoria and Victoria Police.

More details of road closures and traffic control areas will be confirmed and notified closer to the event date.

Will I be able to watch the chimneys come down?

Will I be able to watch the chimneys come down?

Will I be able to watch the chimneys come down?

There will be no community event in respect of the chimney demolition works.

From the perspective of public safety, Australian Standards require that the demolition works not be promoted as public events. Recent government directions in respect of COVID-19 are a further basis upon which public gatherings associated with the works are strictly prohibited.

Notwithstanding the above, ENGIE Hazelwood recognises the public interest in the demolition of the chimneys, and on this basis, is planning to broadcast a “live stream” via the internet.


Section Five

How can I find out more?

How can I find out more?

How can I find out more?

We will provide updates on the chimney demolition via email, local media, a website and ongoing consultations with key stakeholders and regulator agencies.

To obtain further updates or contact the team directly, please email hazelwood.au@engie.com